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WPTavern: GitHub Is Testing Commits on Behalf of Organizations

WPTavern: GitHub Is Testing Commits on Behalf of Organizations

GitHub users may soon be able to contribute to projects on behalf of an organization. This feature has often been requested by developers who are contributing on behalf of their employers.

“Corporate contributions to the third-party open source projects can still be a source of friction and ambiguity,” GitHub Product Manager Ben Balter said. “We’re beta testing a new platform-agnostic commit pattern we hope can help you contribute on behalf of your employer.”

Committers who are members of an organization can add a commit trailer in the following format:

On-behalf-of: @ORG <ORG CONTACT EMAIL>

The committer must use an email that matches the organization’s verified domain and sign the commit. Committing on behalf of an organization can also be done via the command line.

Balter posted a demo of how the organization’s badge appears next to the committer’s. The feature is now in public beta:

It will be interesting to see how well this is adopted among individuals and organizations committing to open source projects. Some projects have more overt contribution from commercial entities than others. Having individuals commit on behalf of their employers makes it easier to track contributions funded by organizations. It may also provide project owners a more accurate picture of how deeply companies are invested in a project, especially in scenarios where the lines between individual and employer contributions are blurry or unclear.


GitHub users may soon be able to contribute to projects on behalf of an organization. This feature has often been requested by developers who are contributing on behalf of their employers. “Corporate contributions to the third-party open source projects can still be a source of friction and ambiguity,” GitHub Product Manager Ben Balter said. “We’re beta testing a new platform-agnostic commit pattern we hope can help you contribute on behalf of your employer.” Committers who are members of an organization can add a commit trailer in the following format: On-behalf-of: @ORG <ORG CONTACT EMAIL> The committer must use an email that matches the organization’s verified domain and sign the commit. Committing on behalf of an organization can also be done via the command line. Balter posted a demo of how the organization’s badge appears next to the committer’s. The feature is now in public beta: It will be interesting to see how well this is adopted among individuals and organizations committing to open source projects. Some projects have more overt contribution from commercial entities than others. Having individuals commit on behalf of their employers makes it easier to track contributions funded by organizations. It may also provide project owners a…

Source: WordPress

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WPTavern: Deploy WordPress Plugins from GitHub to the WordPress.org Plugin Repository

WPTavern: Deploy WordPress Plugins from GitHub to the WordPress.org Plugin Repository

10up has released a GitHub Action that enables developers to deploy to the WordPress.org Plugin repository by tagging a new version on GitHub. Helen Hou-Sandí, 10up’s Director of Open Source Initiatives, explained how it works:

You’ll be able to manage your entire development lifecycle in GitHub—no more futzing with local Bash scripts or controlling commit/push access in multiple places. You reference our action in your plugin repo’s workflow file, filtered to only run when a tag is pushed, and set your username/password secrets. After that, each time you tag a new version on GitHub, whether by pushing a Git tag from the command line or making one using the GitHub releases interface, your plugin will be deployed to WordPress.org.

Developers who want to use this Action will need to sign up for beta access to GitHub Actions in order to create their own Actions-enabled repo for pushing plugin releases to WordPress.org. Check out 10up’s release post and the README file for instructions on how to use and customize the WordPress.org Plugin Deploy action.

Reception from the WordPress development community has been enthusiastic, as anything that removes WordPress.org’s requirement to use SVN qualifies as a little piece of magic. 10up is working on more WordPress Actions that they plan to release soon.


10up has released a GitHub Action that enables developers to deploy to the WordPress.org Plugin repository by tagging a new version on GitHub. Helen Hou-Sandí, 10up’s Director of Open Source Initiatives, explained how it works: You’ll be able to manage your entire development lifecycle in GitHub—no more futzing with local Bash scripts or controlling commit/push access in multiple places. You reference our action in your plugin repo’s workflow file, filtered to only run when a tag is pushed, and set your username/password secrets. After that, each time you tag a new version on GitHub, whether by pushing a Git tag from the command line or making one using the GitHub releases interface, your plugin will be deployed to WordPress.org. Developers who want to use this Action will need to sign up for beta access to GitHub Actions in order to create their own Actions-enabled repo for pushing plugin releases to WordPress.org. Check out 10up’s release post and the README file for instructions on how to use and customize the WordPress.org Plugin Deploy action. Reception from the WordPress development community has been enthusiastic, as anything that removes WordPress.org’s requirement to use SVN qualifies as a little piece of magic. 10up is…

Source: WordPress

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Dev Blog: One-third of the web!

Dev Blog: One-third of the web!

WordPress now powers over 1/3rd of the top 10 million sites on the web according to W3Techs. Our market share has been growing steadily over the last few years, going from 29.9% just one year ago to 33.4% now. We are, of course, quite proud of these numbers!

The path here has been very exciting. In 2005, we were celebrating 50,000 downloads. Six years later, in January 2011, WordPress was powering 13.1% of websites. And now, early in 2019, we are powering 33.4% of sites. Our latest release has already been downloaded close to 14 million times, and it was only released on the 21st of February.

Graph showing the growth of WordPress market share relative to other CMS's like Joomla, Drupal and others. Starting at just over 10% in January 2011 to 33.4% now.WordPress market share on the rise over the last 8 years. Image source: W3Techs.

Over the years WordPress has become the CMS of choice for more and more people and companies. As various businesses use WordPress, the variety of WordPress sites grows. Large enterprise businesses all the way down to small local businesses: all of them use WordPress to power their site. We love seeing that and we strive to continuously make WordPress better for all of you.

We’d like to thank everyone who works on WordPress, which is built and maintained by a huge community of volunteers that has grown alongside the CMS. This incredible community makes it possible for WordPress to keep growing while still also remaining free. And of course, we’d like to thank all of you using WordPress for using it and trusting in it. To all of you: let’s celebrate!


WordPress now powers over 1/3rd of the top 10 million sites on the web according to W3Techs. Our market share has been growing steadily over the last few years, going from 29.9% just one year ago to 33.4% now. We are, of course, quite proud of these numbers! The path here has been very exciting. In 2005, we were celebrating 50,000 downloads. Six years later, in January 2011, WordPress was powering 13.1% of websites. And now, early in 2019, we are powering 33.4% of sites. Our latest release has already been downloaded close to 14 million times, and it was only released on the 21st of February. WordPress market share on the rise over the last 8 years. Image source: W3Techs. Over the years WordPress has become the CMS of choice for more and more people and companies. As various businesses use WordPress, the variety of WordPress sites grows. Large enterprise businesses all the way down to small local businesses: all of them use WordPress to power their site. We love seeing that and we strive to continuously make WordPress better for all of you. We’d like to thank everyone who works on WordPress, which is built and maintained by…

Source: WordPress

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WPTavern: WordCamp Miami to Livestream Workshops, Sessions, and a Worldwide WordPress Trivia Contest March 15-17

WPTavern: WordCamp Miami to Livestream Workshops, Sessions, and a Worldwide WordPress Trivia Contest March 15-17

WordCamp Miami (WCMIA) is heading into its 11th year running this weekend, making it one of the longest running non-profit tech conferences in South Florida. Known for its many learning opportunities and workshops, the event spans three days from March 15 – 17 at Florida International University.

For the vast majority of the WordPress world that cannot make it to Miami, the next best alternative is tuning into the free livestream. WCMIA will be broadcasting a selection of workshops and sessions from the schedule, beginning with the Freelancer’s Workshop on Friday, March 15. The main event features six different tracks, and Saturday’s live broadcast will include sessions from “WordPress & The Web” and the “Design & Community” tracks. Sunday’s livestream will broadcast sessions from the Business track.

WCMIA is also hosting a worldwide WordPress trivia contest on Saturday, March 16, at 6PM EST. It is open to both in-person attendees and livestream viewers. Directions for how to sign into kahoot.it remotely for the game show are available on the event’s website. Digital prizes may be awarded to those playing online and winners will be announced on the WCMIA Twitter account.


WordCamp Miami (WCMIA) is heading into its 11th year running this weekend, making it one of the longest running non-profit tech conferences in South Florida. Known for its many learning opportunities and workshops, the event spans three days from March 15 – 17 at Florida International University. For the vast majority of the WordPress world that cannot make it to Miami, the next best alternative is tuning into the free livestream. WCMIA will be broadcasting a selection of workshops and sessions from the schedule, beginning with the Freelancer’s Workshop on Friday, March 15. The main event features six different tracks, and Saturday’s live broadcast will include sessions from “WordPress & The Web” and the “Design & Community” tracks. Sunday’s livestream will broadcast sessions from the Business track. WCMIA is also hosting a worldwide WordPress trivia contest on Saturday, March 16, at 6PM EST. It is open to both in-person attendees and livestream viewers. Directions for how to sign into kahoot.it remotely for the game show are available on the event’s website. Digital prizes may be awarded to those playing online and winners will be announced on the WCMIA Twitter account.

Source: WordPress

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WPTavern: Automattic Takes on Facebook with “A Meditation on the Open Web”

WPTavern: Automattic Takes on Facebook with “A Meditation on the Open Web”

Last week Automattic published a video titled “A meditation on the open web” that calls out Facebook as the antithesis of the open web:

As you get closer the air gets smoggier and you realize it’s a vast metropolis. It’s surrounded by high concrete walls, completely contained. Inside it’s bustling, lots of honking traffic, people everywhere, the sound is deafening. You see people arguing in bars and chatting on street corners. Billboards and advertisements are everywhere, touting ever kind of good and service. It’s noisy and dense and overwhelming.

This is Facebook.

The video also likens Instagram to a cookie cutter housing development that is actually just a collection of billboards with no one living there.

My expectation before playing the video was that it would enumerate the positive aspects of the open web but I was surprised to find it juxtaposed with Facebook and Instagram in a somewhat jarring fashion midway through. It effectively communicates the stark contrast between the limitations and restrictions of social media silos and the freedom of owning your website.

Open Web Meditation was created as a design experiment at Automattic that encourages viewers to look beyond the walls of dominant social media platforms and consider how our experiences on the web differ based on where we choose to share our ideas. The company is looking to gain global exposure for the video by inviting people to create their own versions of it in their own languages.

Automattic’s video is a timely message, as the world pauses to reflect on the 30th birthday of the World Wide Web this week. In his open letter published by the Web Foundation, Tim Berners-Lee urged companies, governments, and the web’s citizens not to give up on building a better web. He identified “system design that creates perverse incentives,” where user value is sacrificed, as one of the most dangerous threats to the web at this time.

“You can’t just blame one government, one social network or the human spirit,” Berners-Lee said. “Simplistic narratives risk exhausting our energy as we chase the symptoms of these problems instead of focusing on their root causes. To get this right, we will need to come together as a global web community.”

Many commercial entities have enjoyed extraordinary and unprecedented opportunities and influence because of the creation of the world wide web. Berners-Lee underscored their responsibility toward the public as stewards of the open web.

“Companies must do more to ensure their pursuit of short-term profit is not at the expense of human rights, democracy, scientific fact or public safety. Platforms and products must be designed with privacy, diversity and security in mind. This year, we’ve seen a number of tech employees stand up and demand better business practices. We need to encourage that spirit.”

In an interview with the BBC, Berners-Lee said that global action is required tackle the web’s “downward plunge to a dysfunctional future.” This 30-year anniversary is a good time to re-examine our complex relationships with centralized services and return to the guiding principles that have made the web a universal, open place of opportunity.


Last week Automattic published a video titled “A meditation on the open web” that calls out Facebook as the antithesis of the open web: As you get closer the air gets smoggier and you realize it’s a vast metropolis. It’s surrounded by high concrete walls, completely contained. Inside it’s bustling, lots of honking traffic, people everywhere, the sound is deafening. You see people arguing in bars and chatting on street corners. Billboards and advertisements are everywhere, touting ever kind of good and service. It’s noisy and dense and overwhelming. This is Facebook. The video also likens Instagram to a cookie cutter housing development that is actually just a collection of billboards with no one living there. My expectation before playing the video was that it would enumerate the positive aspects of the open web but I was surprised to find it juxtaposed with Facebook and Instagram in a somewhat jarring fashion midway through. It effectively communicates the stark contrast between the limitations and restrictions of social media silos and the freedom of owning your website. Open Web Meditation was created as a design experiment at Automattic that encourages viewers to look beyond the walls of dominant social media platforms and…

Source: WordPress

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Matt: The Web Turns 30

Matt: The Web Turns 30

“Vague, but exciting.” Thirty years ago yesterday, Sir Tim Berners-Lee submitted his original proposal for an information management system to his boss at CERN — what would later become the World Wide Web (and, it turns out, a huge influence on my life and career).

To help celebrate, I tweeted WordPress’s contribution to the web’s grand timeline (above), and I got to participate in The Economist’s Babbage podcast looking back at the pioneers of the early web. Listen to the whole episode below:


In 2003, @WordPress was created to democratize publishing on the open web. #Web30 #ForTheWeb pic.twitter.com/1Xny14pqu4— Matt Mullenweg (@photomatt) March 12, 2019 “Vague, but exciting.” Thirty years ago yesterday, Sir Tim Berners-Lee submitted his original proposal for an information management system to his boss at CERN — what would later become the World Wide Web (and, it turns out, a huge influence on my life and career). To help celebrate, I tweeted WordPress’s contribution to the web’s grand timeline (above), and I got to participate in The Economist’s Babbage podcast looking back at the pioneers of the early web. Listen to the whole episode below:

Source: WordPress

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