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WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 338 – Inflation, WordPress Release Dates, WP GDPR

WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 338 – Inflation, WordPress Release Dates, WP GDPR

In this episode, John James Jacoby and I discuss the news of the week. We talk about the delayed release of WordPress 5.0 and which day would be a suitable release date. We share our opinions on Matt’s answers from his Q&A appearance at WordCamp in Portland, Oregon. We also talk about the changes in WordPress core development, Automatticians in leadership roles, and last, but not least, WordCamp budgeting.

Stories Discussed:

WordPress 5.0 Release Date Update to November 27

Matt Mullenweg Addresses Controversies Surrounding Gutenberg at WordCamp Portland Q&A

WP GDPR Compliance Plugin Patches Privilege Escalation Vulnerability

Maximum Ticket Prices for WordCamps Will Increase to $25 per Day in 2019

WPWeekly Meta:

Next Episode: Wednesday, November 21st 3:00 P.M. Eastern

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Listen To Episode #338:


In this episode, John James Jacoby and I discuss the news of the week. We talk about the delayed release of WordPress 5.0 and which day would be a suitable release date. We share our opinions on Matt’s answers from his Q&A appearance at WordCamp in Portland, Oregon. We also talk about the changes in WordPress core development, Automatticians in leadership roles, and last, but not least, WordCamp budgeting. Stories Discussed: WordPress 5.0 Release Date Update to November 27 Matt Mullenweg Addresses Controversies Surrounding Gutenberg at WordCamp Portland Q&A WP GDPR Compliance Plugin Patches Privilege Escalation Vulnerability Maximum Ticket Prices…

Source: WordPress

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WPTavern: Maximum Ticket Prices for WordCamps Will Increase to $25 per Day in 2019

WPTavern: Maximum Ticket Prices for WordCamps Will Increase to per Day in 2019

For the last seven years, the maximum amount of money WordCamp organizers could charge for ticket prices was $20 per day. In 2019, this will increase to $25 per day.

The new amount accounts for inflation and provides breathing room for organizers. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics inflation calculator, $20 in January of 2006 is equal to $25.51 in October of 2018.

Organizers don’t have to charge this amount and are encouraged to keep the ticket price as low as possible. The increase is also part of a delicate balancing act between not being a financial burden and getting 80% or more of attendees to show up.

“The ticket price does not reflect on the value of the event,” Andrea Middleton, Community organizer said.

“In an ideal world, all WordCamp tickets would be free just like WordPress is free but to avoid organizing a conference for 500 registrants and only having 50 people show up on the day of the event, we charge as little as we possibly can for tickets, but just enough that people will show up for the event if they’re sleepy that morning or got a last-minute invitation to a pool party or something.”

When the proposal to increase the maximum ticket price was published in September, many commenters approved of the increase with some suggesting an even higher amount to account for inflation for the next few years. Ian Dunn questioned whether or not budget shortfalls were due to organizing teams spending money on extra things.

“Beyond that, though, I’m curious why camps are having more trouble today than they were 5 or even 10 years ago?” Dunn said.

“Is it harder to get sponsorships? It seems like the opposite is true, especially given how much the global sponsorship program covers.

“Based on experiences in my local community, I suspect that the primary reason for budget shortfalls is that the organizing team is choosing to do extra things, beyond what’s necessary to meet the goals of a WordCamp. For example, holding after-parties at trendy venues, expensive speaker gifts, professional A/V (which I’ve advocated for in the past, but not at the cost of higher ticket prices), etc.”

It is interesting to ponder how much money WordCamps could save globally by eliminating the materialistic aspects of the event such as t-shirts, speaker gifts, lanyards, badges, signs, etc.

At there core, WordCamps are about gathering the local community together in a physical location to share knowledge. Not every WordPress event needs to mimic WordCamp US or WordCamp Europe, two of the largest events in the world.

Although the WordPress Community team tracks data such as how much each WordCamp charges for ticket prices, the information is not readily available. This is because of the large volume of data that would need to be calculated and displayed. It would be interesting to see an info-graphic of this data where you can compare the average ticket price for WordCamps per country.

Hugh Lashbrooke, a WordPress Community team contributor who has access to the data says that, “globally the majority of camps have lower prices.”

WordCamp organizers are highly encouraged to keep track of attendance as the data is used to help make better informed decisions. The team will review the no-show rates at WordCamps at the end of 2019 to determine if the price increase had any effect. If not, the team may increase the price again for 2020.


For the last seven years, the maximum amount of money WordCamp organizers could charge for ticket prices was $20 per day. In 2019, this will increase to $25 per day. The new amount accounts for inflation and provides breathing room for organizers. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics inflation calculator, $20 in January of 2006 is equal to $25.51 in October of 2018. Organizers don’t have to charge this amount and are encouraged to keep the ticket price as low as possible. The increase is also part of a delicate balancing act between not being a financial burden and…

Source: WordPress

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WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 337 – Gutenberg User Experiences, Release Timelines, and the Classic Editor

WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 337 – Gutenberg User Experiences, Release Timelines, and the Classic Editor

In this episode, John James Jacoby and I break down what’s happening with Gutenberg. We discuss our trials and tribulations with the editor, the release timeline, and calls from members of the community to delay WordPress 5.0 until January. We also share details on how long the Classic Editor plugin will be supported. Last but not least, we talk about the possible release strategy of shipping point releases every two weeks after WordPress 5.0 is released.

Stories Discussed:

How to Add an Image to A Paragraph Block in Gutenberg

Adding Aligned Images to Paragraphs in Gutenberg Is Not as Tough as I Thought

WordPress 5.0 Beta 3 Released, RC 1 Expected November 12

WordPress 5.0 needs a different timeline   

WordPress 5.0 is Not Ready

Classic Editor Plugin May Be Included with 5.0 Updates, Support Window Set to End in 2021

WPWeekly Meta:

Next Episode: Wednesday, November 14th 3:00 P.M. Eastern

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Itunes

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Listen To Episode #337:


In this episode, John James Jacoby and I break down what’s happening with Gutenberg. We discuss our trials and tribulations with the editor, the release timeline, and calls from members of the community to delay WordPress 5.0 until January. We also share details on how long the Classic Editor plugin will be supported. Last but not least, we talk about the possible release strategy of shipping point releases every two weeks after WordPress 5.0 is released. Stories Discussed: How to Add an Image to A Paragraph Block in Gutenberg Adding Aligned Images to Paragraphs in Gutenberg Is Not as Tough…

Source: WordPress

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WPTavern: Adding Aligned Images to Paragraphs in Gutenberg Is Not as Tough as I Thought

WPTavern: Adding Aligned Images to Paragraphs in Gutenberg Is Not as Tough as I Thought

Last week, I published an article that describes the process I went through in Gutenberg to try to add an aligned image to a paragraph block. I concluded that performing the task in the Classic Editor was easier than in Gutenberg.

In response to the article, William Earnhardt compared the process and showed how it can be accomplished in two steps in Gutenberg.

  1. Drag an image into editor where you want it to go.
  2. Click align right.

Dragging and dropping images into WordPress is not something I do. It’s not how I write. His method is simpler but I prefer to work within the interface. His second suggestion of accomplishing the task is the method I’ll use from now on.

  1. Click the block inserter above the paragraph you want to insert the image before.
  2. Select the image block.
  3. Drag the image onto the block.
  4. Click align right.

In the last few months of using Gutenberg, I’ve become accustomed to adding new blocks by pressing enter at the end of a paragraph block or by clicking the plus sign to the left of a block. I haven’t used the plus sign between blocks but it makes sense and indeed, it’s quicker to accomplish the task.

According to Earnhardt, there are even more ways to complete the task in Gutenberg. This brings up an important question, how many different ways and user interfaces should there be to accomplish a task? If you don’t do it a certain way, are you doing_it_wrong?

Take for example, adding captions to images. In Gutenberg, there are at least two opportunities to add a caption. The first is the attachment details screen after uploading or selecting an image from the media library.

The second is the Image block user interface. When using the Image block interface, my cursor gets stuck in the caption area and I need to click outside of the block in order to continue. If I use the attachment details screen, it automatically puts the caption text into the image block, bypassing the hurdle. Which interface am I supposed to use and which method is considered doing_it_wrong?

Adding a Caption via the Image Block Interface

I’m Willing to Learn

I understand the long vision of Gutenberg and what it means for the future of WordPress. For the past several months, I’ve used the plugin and interface exclusively to craft content.

I’ve been learning things along the way and trying to readjust my workflows but the question I keep coming back to when doing things in Gutenberg is why?

Why is this button hidden? Why are there three differently located buttons to add blocks when it would be nice to memorize one? Why does this do that and vice versa? Where is all of the research and usability testing that explains the why behind so many of the interactions and flows? Am I just a moron or is it the interface that guides me in the wrong direction?

Many of my experiences in using Gutenberg this past year have been echoed by Mark Root-Wiley. He does a great job of saying what I’ve been feeling and thinking for a long time.

When I and thousands of others watched Matías Ventura‏ perform a live demo of Gutenberg at the 2017 State of Word, people were blown away. But this is someone who has been creating Gutenberg from the core and is proficient in all that it offers. Is this the level of Gutenberg proficiency I and others need in order to get things done? Probably not, but at times, it sure feels that way.


Last week, I published an article that describes the process I went through in Gutenberg to try to add an aligned image to a paragraph block. I concluded that performing the task in the Classic Editor was easier than in Gutenberg. In response to the article, William Earnhardt compared the process and showed how it can be accomplished in two steps in Gutenberg. Drag an image into editor where you want it to go. Click align right. Dragging and dropping images into WordPress is not something I do. It’s not how I write. His method is simpler but I prefer…

Source: WordPress

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WPTavern: Nidhi Jain Is Awarded the Kim Parsell Travel Scholarship

WPTavern: Nidhi Jain Is Awarded the Kim Parsell Travel Scholarship

In 2015, the WordPress Foundation created a travel scholarship in memory of Kim Parsell. The scholarship covers travel expenses, lodging, and a ticket to the event. This year’s recipient is Nidhi Jain from Udaipur, Rajasthan, India.

Jain is a volunteer organizer for WordCamp Udaipur, a WordPress developer, contributor, and a seasoned traveler.

“Being selected for the Kim Parsell Memorial Scholarship is an honor, achievement and a proud moment for me,” Jain told the WordCamp US organizing team when asked what it means to be selected. 

“I will try my best to make the most out of it and give back to the community in all possible ways. Since I have been a WordCamp volunteer and organizer in the last few years, I am excited to see and learn from WordCamp US. I am sure, I will have a lot of sweet memories and wonderful learnings to take back home.”

Previous winners include Elizabeth Shilling in 2016 and Bianca Welds in 2017. If you’re not familiar with who Kim Parsell is, I recommend reading this essay which provides some context as to why the scholarship was created in her memory.


In 2015, the WordPress Foundation created a travel scholarship in memory of Kim Parsell. The scholarship covers travel expenses, lodging, and a ticket to the event. This year’s recipient is Nidhi Jain from Udaipur, Rajasthan, India. Jain is a volunteer organizer for WordCamp Udaipur, a WordPress developer, contributor, and a seasoned traveler. “Being selected for the Kim Parsell Memorial Scholarship is an honor, achievement and a proud moment for me,” Jain told the WordCamp US organizing team when asked what it means to be selected.  “I will try my best to make the most out of it and give back…

Source: WordPress

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WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 336 – Interview With Andrew Roberts, CEO and Co-founder of Tiny

WPTavern: WPWeekly Episode 336 – Interview With Andrew Roberts, CEO and Co-founder of Tiny

In this episode, John James Jacoby and I are joined by Andrew Roberts, CEO and Co-founder of Tiny. Tiny is the company behind the popular open source library TinyMCE. Roberts shares his entrepreneurial journey, what the company plans on doing with its recent round of funding, and the relationship between TinyMCE and Gutenberg.

Here is an excerpt from the show on what Roberts thinks about Gutenberg.

I think that ultimately Gutenberg will be more innovative than just incrementally changing from the old editor experience toward block-based editing.

I think you know Matt’s probably had a tough year with some of the criticisms around Gutenberg but I admire his courage and leadership because if he hadn’t put his brand equity on the line, if he hadn’t invested his goodwill in doing this, this would never be launching in a month from now.

There may be a painful year or two but in the grand scheme of things this will turn out for the better. It’s taken a lot of courage and bravery for him to do that. He’s taken a lot of shots in the back, but you know that’s why he gets paid the big bucks as they say.

Stories Discussed:

WordPress 5.0 Beta 1
WordPress Accessibility Team Delivers Sobering Assessment of Gutenberg: “We have to draw a line.”
WooCommerce 3.5 Introduces REST API v3, Improves Transactional Emails
WP Engine Acquires Array Themes

WPWeekly Meta:

Next Episode: Wednesday, November 7th 3:00 P.M. Eastern

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Itunes

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via RSS

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Stitcher Radio

Subscribe to WordPress Weekly via Google Play

Listen To Episode #336:


In this episode, John James Jacoby and I are joined by Andrew Roberts, CEO and Co-founder of Tiny. Tiny is the company behind the popular open source library TinyMCE. Roberts shares his entrepreneurial journey, what the company plans on doing with its recent round of funding, and the relationship between TinyMCE and Gutenberg. Here is an excerpt from the show on what Roberts thinks about Gutenberg. I think that ultimately Gutenberg will be more innovative than just incrementally changing from the old editor experience toward block-based editing. I think you know Matt’s probably had a tough year with some of…

Source: WordPress

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