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HeroPress: The Hero’s Journey

HeroPress: The Hero’s Journey
Pull Quote: We cannot know the end of any journey until we find ourselves there.

A couple years ago I noticed that someone had done a talk at WordCamp Brighton called “The Hero’s Journey“. As you can imagine it immediately caught my eye and I went hunting to find this cool person.  As it turns out it was Tamsin Taylor from Brighton and she had a great story. As I was re-reading it today I was struck by her point that great things are built from the foundation of many smaller things. Experience comes from years of simply doing. Maturity comes from years of growing. Heroism comes from many small acts of goodness.

There’s a journey involved in every destination. We face hardship, struggle, pain, and growth, and at the end we’re a different person in a different place. Often we don’t realize it until someone says “Wow, you’re amazing, how did you get so good at that?” and you realize you’ve just been doing it so long that it just feels like who you are.

Find the good things in life and do them over and over until they become who you are.  Also, read Tamsin’s excellent essay:

The Bumpy Journey of Becoming

The post The Hero’s Journey appeared first on HeroPress.


A couple years ago I noticed that someone had done a talk at WordCamp Brighton called “The Hero’s Journey“. As you can imagine it immediately caught my eye and I went hunting to find this cool person.  As it turns out it was Tamsin Taylor from Brighton and she had a great story. As I was re-reading it today I was struck by her point that great things are built from the foundation of many smaller things. Experience comes from years of simply doing. Maturity comes from years of growing. Heroism comes from many small acts of goodness. There’s a…

Source: WordPress

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HeroPress: The “India is cheap” Stereotype

HeroPress: The “India is cheap” Stereotype
Pull quote: Measure success in terms of the impact your work is making.

In the early days of HeroPress there were quite a few Indian contributors, for a variety of reasons. India has long been a technology powerhouse, but the WordPress community was just beginning to get traction. I got to meet many Indians and even traveled there for WordCamp Pune. The stereotype that “India is cheap” is a difficult one for Indians to deal with. What does it mean? How should it be responded to?

In October of 2015 Rahul Bansal, the owner of a world class WordPress agency named rtCamp, did a HeroPress essay where he talks about what it means to run an agency in India, charge properly, and turn our work that rivals any from anywhere else in the world.  Check out Rahul’s thoughts:

WordPress Continues to Inspire

The post The “India is cheap” Stereotype appeared first on HeroPress.


In the early days of HeroPress there were quite a few Indian contributors, for a variety of reasons. India has long been a technology powerhouse, but the WordPress community was just beginning to get traction. I got to meet many Indians and even traveled there for WordCamp Pune. The stereotype that “India is cheap” is a difficult one for Indians to deal with. What does it mean? How should it be responded to? In October of 2015 Rahul Bansal, the owner of a world class WordPress agency named rtCamp, did a HeroPress essay where he talks about what it means…

Source: WordPress

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HeroPress: Diversity of Thought

HeroPress: Diversity of Thought
Pull Quote: I became completely inspired by the mission of WordPress. I had become a part of something bigger than myself.

About a year ago, Christie Chirinos wrote the essay “What I Do Does Not Define Who I Am“. It felt like a big deal at the time, and it was, but like most big deals, it slowly faded from memory. That’s one of the reasons I do these replays, for the benefit of my own memory as much as anything else.

As I’ve mentioned, part of the goal of HeroPress is to speak to those with less privilege and show how WordPress can help overcome that. That message shouldn’t come from me, a white American male. I simply don’t have the experience. I can read about it, but I’ll never actually have the experiences.

The story really needs to come from someone with experience. Christie has some of that experience, and she does a wonderful job talking about how WordPress helped a little bit. I hope her story helps.

What I Do Does Not Define Who I Am

The post Diversity of Thought appeared first on HeroPress.


About a year ago, Christie Chirinos wrote the essay “What I Do Does Not Define Who I Am“. It felt like a big deal at the time, and it was, but like most big deals, it slowly faded from memory. That’s one of the reasons I do these replays, for the benefit of my own memory as much as anything else. As I’ve mentioned, part of the goal of HeroPress is to speak to those with less privilege and show how WordPress can help overcome that. That message shouldn’t come from me, a white American male. I simply don’t have…

Source: WordPress

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HeroPress: WordPress Is For You

HeroPress: WordPress Is For You
Pull Quote: This one simple attitude adjustment, changing “no” to “let me look into that”, opened up more doors and possibilities than I ever thought possible.

When HeroPress started, a stated intention was to be a voice for people on the fringe of the Western WordPress culture. In my head I thought this geographical, and involved places like Africa and Asia. I quickly came to realize that everyone is on the fringe of something.

This month’s HeroPress replay is titled “Doing What I Want”  by Becky Davis. Becky’s an American, but she doesn’t fit the American IT worker mold of young white male. In fact, her gender and age were regular friction points in her attempts to get jobs. She’s not old by any means, but she’s not 19 either.

WordPress became a place for her where things like age and gender don’t matter nearly as much as other jobs. Check out Becky’s essay and perhaps drop her a comment.

 

Doing What I Want

The post WordPress Is For You appeared first on HeroPress.


When HeroPress started, a stated intention was to be a voice for people on the fringe of the Western WordPress culture. In my head I thought this geographical, and involved places like Africa and Asia. I quickly came to realize that everyone is on the fringe of something. This month’s HeroPress replay is titled “Doing What I Want”  by Becky Davis. Becky’s an American, but she doesn’t fit the American IT worker mold of young white male. In fact, her gender and age were regular friction points in her attempts to get jobs. She’s not old by any means, but…

Source: WordPress

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HeroPress: Have Faith In Yourself

HeroPress: Have Faith In Yourself
Pull Quote: It may not all pan out, but I'm along for the ride with WordPress in my backpack & I cannot wait to see where I end up.

A couple years ago I was at Prestige Conf in Minneapolis. I noticed a young woman sitting by herself, patiently waiting for the talks to start, and thought I’d say hi. Her name was Stacey, and she was a freelance web developer and design expert. She was had recently quit her job to go freelance and this conference was part of her self-education.

Our conversation brought back lots of memories of the excitement of when I first quit a good job to go freelance, but I was impressed by how much more attention to detail she’d paid than I had. I was a Bad Freelancer.

A few weeks later it occurred to me that she might be willing to make the header banners for HeroPress essays. I asked, and she agreed at a price I could afford.  For a couple years now all of the banners you’ve seen on HeroPress were made by Stacey Bartron. No-one else has ever told me this, but I think the banners are pretty important to the essays and she’s done a wonderful, meaningful job.

Stacey quit her job and went freelance because she had faith in her own abilities. Her skills were greater than the use to which they were being put at The Day Job. As it turns out, she was right.

Check out Stacey’s very own HeroPress essay here:

Finding WordPress in Fargo

The post Have Faith In Yourself appeared first on HeroPress.


A couple years ago I was at Prestige Conf in Minneapolis. I noticed a young woman sitting by herself, patiently waiting for the talks to start, and thought I’d say hi. Her name was Stacey, and she was a freelance web developer and design expert. She was had recently quit her job to go freelance and this conference was part of her self-education. Our conversation brought back lots of memories of the excitement of when I first quit a good job to go freelance, but I was impressed by how much more attention to detail she’d paid than I had.…

Source: WordPress

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HeroPress: India and HeroPress

HeroPress: India and HeroPress
Pull Quote: Nothing is better than a girl who writes code.

It’s no secret that HeroPress was greatly helped in its early days by people from India. Jeet, Saurabh, Aditya, Alexander, and many others gave deep and meaningful advice on how I, as a white American male, should approach the task I had set before me. This is one of the reasons it makes me so happy when I hear stories of how WordPress changes lives there, especially for women.

This week’s HeroPress replay is from Juhi Patel, from Gujarat, in northwestern India. As I recall, hers was also the very first HeroPress essay to be multi-lingual, something I’ve always wanted.

Juhi’s culture isn’t too keen on women doing Professional work, a problem not all that uncommon throughout the world. Not only did she have the courage to move against that belief system, WordPress gave her the tools to practically make it happen, and thereby be an example to other women around her. There are still good things happening in the world, and Juhi is helping to make them happen.

Check out her essay here:

Is WordPress Good for Indian Women?

The post India and HeroPress appeared first on HeroPress.


It’s no secret that HeroPress was greatly helped in its early days by people from India. Jeet, Saurabh, Aditya, Alexander, and many others gave deep and meaningful advice on how I, as a white American male, should approach the task I had set before me. This is one of the reasons it makes me so happy when I hear stories of how WordPress changes lives there, especially for women. This week’s HeroPress replay is from Juhi Patel, from Gujarat, in northwestern India. As I recall, hers was also the very first HeroPress essay to be multi-lingual, something I’ve always wanted.…

Source: WordPress

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